Wellbeing & Resilience

“Nurses are the front lines of public health,” says Kate Garrison, RN BA, who has been in the field for over two decades, including in her current role as case manager at a small community hospital in New England. Garrison feels the two disciplines—public health and nursing—need to talk to each other more. “Nurses are gathering public health data all day long,” she adds, “but it isn’t seen that way because no one is asking them to share that data.”
5 Min Read
Health workers take on so much – they are tireless caregivers; advocates; and confidants, often undertaking a considerable amount of emotional pressure in their jobs. This couldn’t be truer during the pandemic, and health workers around the world are feeling the strain. A recent study shows that more than 33% of nurses stated their mental health as bad or very bad, underscoring the concern that the current pandemic will lead to an increase of stress and job burnout among health care workers.
1 Min Read
In over half the countries in the world including Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines, there is only one psychiatrist per 100,000 people. In Asia Pacific, mental illness is the second largest contributor to years lost due to disability. Additionally, less than half of those affected receive any medical treatment, and in China and India, it is less than a tenth. Even when treatment is accessible, it is often insufficient.
4 Min Read
At the Johnson & Johnson Center for Health Worker Innovation, we believe that sustainable improvements in the delivery of and access to quality primary care require a long-term commitment to enabling and supporting the well-being of the deliverer of care—the frontline health worker.
5 Min Read
During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve seen the impact of overburdened health systems pushed to the limit and the heart of those systems – our health and other essential workers – rise to the occasion with remarkable expertise and determination despite enormous risks. But that determination clearly comes at a cost and begs the question: How can we better care for those who are caring for us?
1 Min Read
The global death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in China has risen to more than 1,870, surpassing the SARS epidemic in 2003. From Ebola in West Africa to Zika in South America to MERS in the Middle East, dangerous outbreaks are on the rise around the world. Over the past 60 years, the number of new diseases cropping up in a decade has almost quadrupled. The number of outbreaks each year has more than tripled since 1980. And when epidemics or pandemics hit, they usually hit the poor first and worst.
4 Min Read