Training & Education

The day of birth should be among the happiest days for a family. However, this joy may turn into sorrow and anguish when the baby is born preterm (before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy) and struggles for survival. Worldwide, an estimated 15 million babies are born preterm, which is more than 1 in 10. Complications due to preterm birth are the single leading cause of neonatal deaths, accounting for 35% of the 3.1 million neonatal deaths every year. Among the babies who survive, some may face life-long health issues related to preterm birth such as hearing, visual and learning disabilities.
2 Min Read
A 2018 study in The Lancet showed that 5 million people in low- to middle-income countries died in 2016 from poor quality healthcare, and an additional 1.5 million people from not having access to care itself.
8 Min Read
A few years ago, I met Wang Linyun, a nurse/midwife from Taiyuan Maternity Hospital in Shanxi, China. The photo below is a screenshot from an interview—she is expressing the utter desperation and helplessness she felt when she did not know how to help a baby experiencing childbirth complications. If a baby died or suffered a long-term disability, she blamed herself!But one may ask, how could a nurse/midwife in a maternity ward not know what to do? To answer that, let’s look at Wang Linyun’s pathway to becoming a midwife. Like many nurses/midwives in China and elsewhere, Wang completed her 3-year general nursing education, which included few midwifery specific courses. After attending 20 supervised births at a local hospital where she was expected to “learn on the job,” she was licensed to work as an obstetric nurse (Chinese title for midwife). In short, Wang became a midwife with little midwifery education or training.
5 Min Read
A disproportionate number of women die from preventable pregnancy-related causes in rural Indonesia. Most of them deliver at home with traditional birth attendants who are not equipped to handle complications during labor and childbirth, contributing to Indonesia’s high maternal mortality rate—one of the highest in Southeast Asia.
3 Min Read
By WHO estimates we need 18 million more frontline health workers (FLHWs) by 2030 to achieve SDG targets and other global health aspirations. An article authored by the Center for Health Worker Innovation's Joanne Peter, published on the ICTworks™ website, discusses how task shifting to virtual services is an opportunity for health systems to do more with the FLHWs they currently have.
1 Min Read
The COVID-19 pandemic has clearly underscored the urgent need to close the critical gap in health worker coverage. According to the The State of the World’s Nursing Report (2020) by the World Health Organization (WHO), the South-East Asia region is projected to have under 25 nurses per 10,000 people by 2030, below the WHO’s benchmark of 27.4 nurses per 10,000. The countries accounting for the largest shortages in 2018 included Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Nigeria.
3 Min Read
Access to high-quality and affordable training is critical to addressing the need for frontline health workers like nurses, and the 18 million health worker shortfall in global health more broadly.
1 Min Read